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Call for Chapters: Issues in Language Testing Around the World
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 Export to Your Calendar 10/28/2017 to 2/15/2018
When: Saturday, October 28, 2017
Where: United States

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In conjunction with Springer Education and Language, a collection of chapters on problems in language testing, tentatively titled Issues in Language Testing Around the World: Insights for Language Test Users and edited by Betty Lanteigne, Christine Coombe, and James Dean Brown, is being put together.

Issues in Language Testing Around the World will combine insights from language assessment literacy and critical language testing addressing issues in language testing. The focus is on insights and solutions that language professionals have found because of mishaps and mistakes, even malpractice, in language testing in various contexts, involving tests of global, regional, or national languages. The purpose of this book is to provide insights and solutions for test users (such as language program directors, testing center directors, and language teachers) to help them improve their testing practices, especially what to avoid and why.

Test developers of international standardized language tests are very aware of the importance of addressing all facets of test reliability and validity, and thus they are diligent to anticipate and avoid poor testing practices. However, not all language program directors, testing center directors, and language teachers are aware of what and how testing mistakes (or malpractices) can negatively affect test validity, including societal effects beyond the language classroom. A very crucial part of increasing language assessment literacy is helping language test users be aware of potential consequences of not following language testing principles when administering, scoring, and/or interpreting and using test results. Seeing the consequences of flawed practices can actually be enlightening, highlighting the importance at all levels of language testing of adhering to reliability and validity as appropriate for local contexts.

Thus, using insights from language assessment literacy and critical language testing, chapters in Issues in Language Testing Around the World will identify the consequences and implications of problematic practices in language testing which are relevant to language test users. Thus, the audience for this book would be language program directors, testing center personnel, language teachers, and teachers in training in master’s programs in language education. Chapters in Issues in Language Testing Around the World will address real-life language testing situations which illustrate complications of not following language testing principles, including some or all of the following possible topics:

• needs analysis
• test specifications
• test writing
• test development and production
• test piloting
• test administration
• test scoring
• score interpretation and use
• collaboration in test development
• cultural or institutional factors
Two approaches to critical language testing literacy will be presented in Parts 1 and 2. Chapters in Part 1 will include short discussions describing the context, problematic aspect of language testing, solution found, insight gained from the experience, and implications for test users. Chapters in Part 2 will be longer and include qualitative, quantitative, or mixed-methods investigations, including case studies and natural experiments, about actual language testing practices in different regions around the world involving mishaps, mistakes, and even malpractice. Part 1 chapter contributions should be up to 4,000 words in length (including references, tables, graphs, and appendices), and Part 2 chapters should be 8,000 words, although the length of case study or natural experiment chapters can in some cases be negotiated.

Submission Process

Language testing researchers are invited to submit by February 15, 2018, a chapter abstract of approximately 500 words about the proposed chapter, describing the context, problematic aspect of language testing, insight gained from the experience, and implications for test users. Abstracts should be emailed to Betty Lanteigne – blanteigne@aus.edu.

Chapters must be written in British English or American English. (Springer can provide authors with assistance with English, if necessary.) Each chapter should adhere to the following format:

1. Introduction: Purpose and Testing Context
2. Testing Problem Encountered
3. Solution/Resolution of the Problem OR Review of Literature, Methodology, and Findings
4. Insight(s) Gained
5. Conclusion: Implications for Test Users

All submitted chapters will be reviewed by the editors. Contributors must follow Springer guidelines for manuscript submission prior to final chapter submission. These guidelines will be provided to authors of accepted abstracts.

Important Dates

Abstract submission: Feb 15, 2018
Notification of acceptance of abstract: April 10, 2018
Full chapter submission: October 1, 2018
Notification of acceptance: March 1, 2019

Contact

Betty Lanteigne: blanteigne@aus.edu
Christine Coombe: ccoombe@hct.ac.ae
JD Brown: brownj@hawaii.edu

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